Suboxone Treatment

Suboxone Treatment

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Suboxone is a medication containing buprenorphine and naloxone used to treat opioid addiction. Suboxone is often used as part of medication-assisted treatment (MAT) plan to help manage the symptoms of withdrawal from opioids and reduce cravings for the drug. We administer Suboxone to our clients to either help stabilize withdrawal symptoms or as a maintenance treatment to promote recovery. At Fusion Recovery, the goal for our clients is sustained recovery. We believe that maintenance treatment along with therapy helps our clients stay in recovery.

Benefits of Suboxone as a treatment for opioid use disorder (OUD):

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Manages withdrawal symptoms.

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Reduces opioid cravings.

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Decreases risk of overdose.

Safe and Effective Treatment.

01.

Evaluation

When you first arrive at Fusion Recovery, you will receive a full evaluation from our clinical team. This evaluation includes a full physical exam and questions about your history with addiction, family history, past treatment history, and current symptoms. This step helps us develop the proper treatment plan for you.

02.

Treatment

After your evaluation, our clinical team will formulate a treatment plan for you. Treatment begins with detox where you will learn to manage withdrawal and control cravings. Suboxone can help you manage detox. When detox is complete, you will begin your treatment program which can include Suboxone maintenance treatment along with addiction counseling.

03.

Recovery

Once you have a treatment plan, recovery can begin. To maintain sobriety, it is important to receive continuous treatment and stay focused and dedicated to therapy. Our outpatient setting provides flexible options for treatment. Your sustained recovery is important to us, so we will make sure that your treatment plan works for you.

See if you’re covered.

Free yourself from the
cycle of addiction.

Suboxone maintenance treatment can help you remain on the right path in recovery. While Suboxone is a great start to treatment, at Fusion Recovery we believe that sustainable recovery takes more than that. With the compassion, support, and guidance of our experienced team, we offer therapy and treatment services that are the foundation of our program. We aim to help you uncover the root problem of your addiction and help you heal your inner wounds. Once you better understand your addiction, we can help you prevent relapse and free yourself from addiction.

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Myth vs. Facts.

MYTH:

You aren’t really in recovery if you are on Suboxone.

FACT:

Suboxone is a medication that helps regulate your addiction. It is used as an evidence-based treatment to curb cravings and help with withdrawal. Suboxone is an effective treatment option for those in recovery.

MYTH:

Those in addiction treatment misuse Suboxone.

FACT:

Suboxone does not cause the euphoric feeling that opioids such as heroin or oxycodone do. You do not get the high that you receive from other opioids. Those who use Suboxone are using it to subside the effects of opioids. Unless it is mixed with other substances, Suboxone is extremely difficult to overdose on.

MYTH:

Methadone will damage your liver and other organs.

FACT:

When you take methadone in the prescribed amount determined by a licensed opioid treatment program, methadone does not affect your liver or any other internal organs. Methadone is an FDA-approved safe medication to treat withdrawal symptoms in people with an opioid use disorder.

MYTH:

Suboxone should only be taken for a short period of time.

FACT:

There is no evidence to support this claim. Many providers support prescribing Suboxone as a long-term treatment option.

FAQs

Suboxone, a combination of naloxone and buprenorphine, is a type of medication called an opioid agonist that is used to treat opioid use disorder (OUD). This medication works by blocking the opioid receptors in your brain to ease withdrawal symptoms and reduce the risk of relapse. It is similar to opioids, yet unless taken in excessive amounts, cannot produce the same euphoric qualities that opioids create.

Suboxone can be abused, just as any other opioid, though it takes much more effort. When taken as directed by a medical professional, suboxone is a helpful form of medication assisted treatment (MAT) that helps wean people off of opioid dependence.

Suboxone can show up on certain drug tests since it is similar to opioids, though it typically requires a specialized test that can detect suboxone. Compared to other opioids, the buprenorphine in suboxone has an especially long elimination half-life. This refers to the amount of time it takes for half of a single dose of any drug to leave your body.

For buprenorphine, this takes between 24 to 48 hours, and it takes 5 half-lives for a substance to completely leave your body, so it can take between 7 to 9 days for buprenorphine to completely leave your body. Naloxone, the other ingredient in suboxone, has a half-life of 2 to 12 hours, so it can stay in your body for up to 60 hours.

During the process of metabolizing suboxone, your liver creates metabolites that stay in the body even longer than the actual substance. This means that even once the actual medication has left your body, certain drug tests may still be able to pick up these metabolites and give you a positive test for buprenorphine even after the 7 to 9 days have elapsed.

There are many factors that influence how long metabolizing suboxone will take for your body. These factors include your age, weight, and metabolism speed, as well as the frequency of your suboxone use and the dosage. Other factors that can affect the length it takes for suboxone to leave your body are your liver health and whether you are combining suboxone with other medications or substances.

The length of time you may test positive for suboxone also depends on the type of drug test that is being given to you. Blood tests, although rare, can be used to detect suboxone as soon as 2 hours after your last dose, with this test being most effective when given shortly after ingestion of suboxone. Saliva tests can detect suboxone for a time period of a few days to a little over a week after your last dose.

Urine tests are the most commonly administered drug test, especially by employers. These tests can detect suboxone in your system for up to 2 weeks. With hair follicle drug tests, suboxone and its metabolites may be detected for up to 1 to 3 months, although these tests are considered less reliable.


Suboxone is a prescribed medication known as a partial opioid agonist that is used to treat opioid use disorder (OUD). This evidence based treatment is formed from a combination of buprenorphine and naloxone, and is typically administered in a film or tablet form. Suboxone is used for medication assisted treatment (MAT) by easing opioid withdrawal symptoms and blocking the opioid receptors in your brain to reduce the risk of relapse.

Unlike methadone, another medication used to treat substance use disorder, suboxone does not need to be administered by a clinic devoted to MAT and can be prescribed by your doctor. Many people are nervous to begin suboxone treatment because they have concerns about if suboxone is addictive, and while it can be abused, it is not inherently addictive.

If not taken as directed, there is a chance that you may form a dependence on suboxone, so it is important to follow the instructions of your doctor and take only the prescribed dose. However, as suboxone does not create the same euphoric qualities as other opioids, the desire to misuse suboxone is greatly lessened.

In addition, the buprenorphine in suboxone has what is referred to as a “ceiling effect,” meaning that even if the dose is increased, the opioid effects plateau at a certain point and cannot produce any stronger feelings. This reduces the risk of misuse or overdose.

The naloxone that is present in suboxone works as an opioid blocker, meaning that it is only absorbed in the body and activated if the drug is injected instead of taken orally as prescribed. This means that for those with an opioid dependency who inject naloxone, they will experience adverse side effects. This is meant to deter individuals from injecting suboxone instead of taking it as prescribed, so the risk of suboxone misuse is greatly lessened.

Suboxone helps with addiction treatment by lessening the side effects of opioid withdrawal, although it is not a cure for opioid addiction. Suboxone should be used as part of a comprehensive treatment option that includes mental health treatment such as therapy for mental illness, along with support groups and educational workshops that help patients understand substance abuse and the negative effects it has on not just their lives, but the lives of their loved ones as well.

Suboxone is administered by medical professionals as a part of medical detox, as it helps patients move on from the detox phase and begin to focus fully on their recovery. Suboxone is typically only used to treat opioid dependence for short-acting opioids, such as heroin and prescription painkillers. Suboxone is not recommended for treating long-acting opioids, and treatment for this form of opioid dependence is typically a buprenorphine-only medication.

As with any other medication, taking suboxone to treat your opioid dependence can lead to side effects. Side effects of suboxone include flu-like symptoms, vomiting, sweating, abdominal pain, low energy, and headache. If you begin to experience these symptoms, talk to your doctor but do not stop taking suboxone without your doctor’s approval. Stopping suboxone suddenly can lead to the return of opioid withdrawal symptoms such as joint and muscle pain, irritability, dilated pupils, insomnia, feeling jittery, and diarrhea.

 


Suboxone is a form of medication assisted treatment (MAT) that is used to treat opioid use disorder. Suboxone is a combination of buprenorphine and naloxone. Suboxone works by blocking the opioid receptors so that people who take suboxone cannot feel any effects of opioid use while taking the medication. This reduces the risk of relapse, since the euphoric effects of opioid use are unachievable.

The buprenorphine in suboxone is a type of medication known as a partial opioid agonist, which means that it works similarly to opioids and produces the same feelings the opioids do, but at a much weaker rate. It also means that the effects produced by buprenorphine eventually plateau, so once that point is reached, taking more of the drug will not lead to an increase in effects. This is known as the “”ceiling effect” and is a deterrent against suboxone misuse.

The naloxone in suboxone is what is known as an opioid antagonist, which means that it is only absorbed in the body and activated if the drug is injected instead of taken orally as prescribed. The point of this is to deter individuals from injecting suboxone instead of taking it as prescribed, since anyone with an opioid dependency who injects naloxone will experience adverse side effects. This is meant to reduce the risk of suboxone misuse, as people will be more inclined to take it as prescribed.

When taken as prescribed, not only will suboxone block opioid receptors to reduce the risk of relapse, but it will also lessen the pain of opioid withdrawal symptoms. This form of addiction treatment helps those struggling with opioid addiction get through withdrawal more easily so they can begin focusing on recovery. Suboxone is not meant to be a cure for opioid dependence, but rather a part of a larger comprehensive treatment program that includes therapy and support groups to address the root of the addiction.

The length of time a patient takes suboxone depends on the severity of the opioid addiction, and some patients may need to take it indefinitely. The dose of the medication may be changed once a patient’s opioid drug cravings subside, and they may receive less medication in an effort to be weaned off of dependence on any opioids, including dependence on suboxone.

How long suboxone works is dependent upon a few factors, such as each individual’s weight, metabolism, and history of substance abuse. On average, suboxone blocks the effects of opioids for at least a full day, or 24 hours. However, in some people the effects of suboxone may last as long as 60 hours. This is also dependent upon the strength of the dosage each patient receives.

For example, if the prescription amount is only 1 milligram of suboxone, the medication will typically last for 12 to 36 hours. If the prescription amount is larger, such as 16 milligrams of suboxone, the effects of the medication may last the full 60 hours. How much suboxone is prescribed is different for each individual, and doctors will factor in a patient’s age, weight, metabolism, and severity of opioid dependence when deciding the correct dosage.

 


Suboxone is a form of medication assisted treatment (MAT) that is used to treat opioid use disorder (OUD). Suboxone treatment works against opioid addiction by blocking the opioid receptors in the brain and easing opioid withdrawal symptoms. The medication is a combination of buprenorphine and naloxone, a partial opioid agonist and an opioid antagonist that work together to reduce the risk of relapse and opioid overdose.

Unlike other drugs used for medication assisted treatment, suboxone does not have to be administered at a rehab center as part of a medical detox program. People struggling with opioid dependence can get prescribed suboxone from an eligible suboxone treatment provider. This can include licensed physicians, nurse practitioners, physician’s assistants, or other eligible medical professionals.

If you feel that your addiction is severe, it may be beneficial to receive suboxone as part of an addiction treatment program at an inpatient rehab center. Suboxone clinics can help monitor your use and talk you through any cravings or withdrawal symptoms you are experiencing. Since suboxone is meant to be part of a comprehensive treatment program that includes behavioral therapies and support groups to address your mental health, a residential treatment program is considered convenient to many patients.

However, not everyone can afford to take the time off or spend the money required to seek inpatient rehab, so outpatient suboxone administration is also a good option. Receiving a suboxone prescription from a licensed medical professional and not a residential rehab facility allows patients to continue their daily life and not have to uproot their routine in order to seek treatment.

To receive a suboxone prescription, you must make an appointment with an eligible suboxone treatment provider. During this appointment, you will be assessed for the necessity of receiving medication assisted treatment. One of the first things you will have to do is take a urine drug test to determine your opioid use. After this, the doctor will then ask questions about your medical history and substance abuse history, as well as check your vital signs.

If the doctor determines you are eligible to receive suboxone, the next step is devising a treatment plan. The treatment plan for receiving suboxone will vary for each individual, but typically doctors will take into consideration factors such as the length of time you have been dependent on opioids, the amount of opioids you use in a day, and how many different kinds of opioids you have used. This helps your doctor determine the correct suboxone dosage for your treatment.

During the beginning of suboxone treatment, your doctor may require you to receive weekly or daily drug tests to make sure the suboxone is not interacting with any other drugs, such as opioids. After a few weeks into the treatment, you may only be asked for a monthly drug test. As treatment progresses, your doctor will schedule appointments less frequently and you may only have monthly visits to check your progress and make any necessary changes to your prescription.

Suboxone is a form of medication assisted treatment (MAT) that works to treat opioid use disorder. Suboxone is a combination of buprenorphine and naloxone, which are two drugs that work against opioid addiction. This medication works by blocking the opioid receptors in the brain and easing the pain of withdrawal symptoms to reduce the risk of relapse.

The effects of suboxone are similar to the effects of opioids, yet on a much weaker scale. The buprenorphine in suboxone is what is known as a partial opioid agonist, meaning that it works similarly to opioids and produces the same feelings the opioids do to lessen the withdrawal symptoms, but with much less intensity than actual opioids.

It also means that the effects produced by buprenorphine eventually plateau, so once that point is reached, taking more of the drug will not lead to an increase in effects. This is known as the “”ceiling effect” and is a deterrent against suboxone misuse.

The naloxone in suboxone is what is known as an opioid antagonist, which means that it is only absorbed in the body and activated if the drug is injected instead of taken orally as prescribed. The point of this is to deter individuals from injecting suboxone instead of taking it as prescribed, since anyone with an opioid dependency who injects naloxone will experience adverse side effects. This is meant to reduce the risk of suboxone misuse, as people will be more inclined to take it as prescribed.

While difficult to misuse suboxone, it is certainly possible. As suboxone does produce similar effects to that of opioids, taking the medication not as directed can create similar feelings to opioid use, although the intensity cannot increase no matter how much is taken due to the ceiling effect. However, although the high is not as intense, it may last longer, which can lead to suboxone dependence.

Because of the difficulty presented with misusing suboxone to achieve euphoric effects, many people who abuse suboxone do not use it to get high, but rather to relieve opioid withdrawal symptoms in between opioid use. When suboxone is injected instead of taken orally, the naloxone activates and can induce symptoms of opioid withdrawal instead of alleviating the symptoms.

Since the potential for drug misuse is present with suboxone, using suboxone as a form of addiction treatment should be heavily monitored. Suboxone can only be prescribed by an eligible suboxone treatment provider, such as an addiction center or licensed doctor. When taking suboxone to treat opioid use disorder, only take the prescribed dosage, and take it as directed.

Suboxone is not meant to be a cure for opioid addiction, but instead part of a comprehensive evidence based treatment program that addresses the root cause of opioid use disorder and seeks to overcome opioid dependence by using methods like therapy and support groups. By adhering to an addiction treatment program, the likelihood of suboxone misuse drops dramatically. Using suboxone correctly in combination with other treatments can help sustain long-term recovery.

Suboxone is a safe and effective treatment option for opiate addiction. If you have questions about our program or would like to learn more about Fusion Recovery and our Suboxone maintenance program, please reach out to us! Our staff is on hand to answer any questions or concerns you may have.

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